womens health

Preventing Progression from Pre-Diabetes to Full-Blown Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 422 million adults have diabetes, and this number is expected to rise in the coming years. The United States alone has an estimated 34 million people with diabetes.

Pre-diabetes is a condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. It increases the risk of developing full-blown diabetes mellitus, as well as other health complications such as heart disease and stroke.

The good news is that pre-diabetes can be reversed or prevented through lifestyle changes such as healthy eating habits, regular physical activity, and weight loss. In this article, we will discuss ways to prevent progression from pre-diabetes to full-blown diabetes mellitus.

What Is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes occurs when blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), pre-diabetes means having:

– A1C level between 5.7% and 6.4%

– Fasting blood glucose level between 100 mg/dL and 125 mg/dL

– Oral glucose tolerance test result between140 mg/dL and199mg/dL

People with pre-diabetes may not experience any symptoms at first, which makes it difficult for them to know they have it without getting tested by their healthcare provider.

Risk Factors for Pre-Diabetes

Several factors increase the risk of developing pre-diabetes or progressing from it into full-blown diabetes mellitus:

– Being overweight or obese

– Lack of physical activity

– Family history of type 2 diabetes

– High blood pressure

– Age over 45 years old

– Having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

– Having a history of gestational diabetes

Preventing Progression from Pre-Diabetes to Full-Blown Diabetes Mellitus

The good news is that pre-diabetes can be reversed or prevented through lifestyle changes. Here are some tips to help prevent progression from pre-diabetes to full-blown diabetes mellitus:

1. Healthy Eating Habits

Eating healthy foods helps control blood sugar levels, maintain a healthy weight, and reduce the risk of developing other health complications such as heart disease.

Focus on eating whole grains, fruits, vegetables, lean protein sources like chicken and fish, low-fat dairy products, and healthy fats like nuts and seeds. Avoid processed foods high in added sugars or unhealthy fats.

2. Regular Physical Activity

Physical activity helps improve insulin sensitivity and lower blood sugar levels. Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise per week such as brisk walking or cycling.

Incorporate strength training exercises two days per week to build muscle mass which will help burn more calories even when you are not exercising.

3. Weight Loss

Losing weight reduces insulin resistance which leads to better blood sugar control. Even losing just 5% -10% of your body weight can make a significant difference in preventing progression from pre-diabetes to full-blown diabetes mellitus.

4. Medications

Medications may be necessary if lifestyle changes alone do not bring down blood glucose levels enough to prevent type 2 diabetes development.

Metformin is one medication that has been shown effective in delaying onset of type 2 diabetes among people with prediabetes who were overweight or obese by about half over four years according to the Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group study published in The New England Journal Of Medicine .

Future Advances on This Topic

Researchers continue studying ways on how best we can prevent progression from prediabetes into Type II Diabetes Mellitus . A recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism found that a low-carbohydrate diet can help reverse pre-diabetes and prevent progression to type 2 diabetes.

The researchers compared a low-carbohydrate diet (20% carbohydrate, 60% fat) with a high-carbohydrate diet (55% carbohydrate, 27% fat) among people with obesity and prediabetes for six months.

They found that those on the low-carbohydrate diet had greater improvements in blood sugar control, insulin sensitivity, and weight loss than those on the high-carbohydrate diet.

In conclusion, preventing progression from pre-diabetes to full-blown diabetes mellitus is possible through lifestyle changes such as healthy eating habits, regular physical activity, weight loss ,and medication if necessary . By making these changes today you can reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes and its associated health complications.

*Note: this site does not provide medical opinions or diagnosis and should not be relied upon instead of receiving medical attention from a licensed medical professional.

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1WH staff